Three myths about cooking meat, which for some reason have not been confirmed by my experience

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Three myths about cooking meat, which for some reason have not been confirmed by my experience

Let's go through the myths that exist around cooking meat? I just came across a statement yesterday that if the meat is "undercooked" (in fact - not overdried), then it "bleeds".

And immediately the first myth turns out: if pink juice flows from meat, it is "blood"

Maybe this myth appeared because of the name of the roast - with blood? Or because of the color - pinkish - of the juice?

In fact, there is initially no blood in the meat from which we prepare food. All blood is removed at the stage of carcass preparation. Remember the technology (I won't describe it, it's shock content after all).

And the pinkish color of the juice of weak or even medium-roasted meat happens because the muscle protein myoglobin has not completely disintegrated in it. It decomposes at temperatures above 70 degrees, as far as I remember, and such a temperature in the middle of a piece most often means that we dry out the edges of it.

Myth two: if the meat is immediately subjected to very rapid heating to a high temperature, then a crust will form on it, which will seal all the juices.

You know I tried. I tried in the most honest way. But the crust, which will be impervious to moisture, is from the category of fantasy. Moisture is such a thing that it both comes out of the piece and is absorbed back into it.

And I also have a suspicion: the rate of crust formation does not depend on the surface temperature that comes into contact with a piece of meat, and not on the air temperature in the oven. The speed depends on how dry the surface of the meat is.

Well, in order to preserve the juice, it is best to give the meat a “rest” after cooking, so that the temperature balance is established in the piece. And if you eat it right away, with heat, with heat, then the juice will flow out, no matter how you “seal” it.

Myth three: in order for the meat to be tasty, it must be salted at the very end.

I tried it. Again, in the most honest way I tried to salt both before, and after, and in the middle. You know, I didn't notice much of a difference. Even in broths.

Yes, it is believed that salt "draws" juices from meat, but we do not use salt during cooking as much as during salting, and therefore there is no critical effect on meat.

Although I myself sprinkle salt on the steak after cooking - and coarse one. This is my fetish, so to speak. And yes, it is in this case that it tastes better to me. But goulash, for example, can be perfectly salted right away. And add salt after cooking, but not on the plate.

By the way, have you come across myths that for some reason are not confirmed by experience?

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